Yoga Nook Teacher Profile: Di Hickman

Here we go, February! This month we’re featuring Yoga Nook teacher and fitness pro Di Hickman. Di recently joined our 200-hour teacher training as assistant, and she teaches weekly classes at both Yoga Nook locations:

Monday 5:45-7:00 pm | Sun Salutations 1&2 (@ Fifth)
Wednesday 10:30-11:30 am | Beginning / Yoga 1 (Cochran)
Thursday 5:45-7:00 pm | Sun Salutations 2 (Cochran)

Read on to learn more about Di’s yoga journey, her background in fitness, and her approach to practice and teaching. Then bring a friend and join her on the mat — her classes will be $10 community classes for the month of February.

What originally drew you to the practice of yoga? How has your practice changed over time? 

I attended my very first yoga class around age 13 and enjoyed it a lot. However, a year later yoga was “out” and Jane Fonda was “in.” So much so that I became a personal trainer and group fitness instructor. Yoga was just something I did occasionally to relieve my stress and physical ailments.

For too many years, I was stuck in a cycle: work out, get injured, do yoga, feel better, and then go back to not doing yoga. I eventually realized that if I felt better when I did yoga, why didn’t I just continue to do it? That was 8 years ago, and my practice has been consistent ever since.

Why did you decide to become a Registered Yoga Teacher? 

About six years ago, I started teaching a yoga class at the gym I was working at. With my background in fitness, I knew the anatomy and physiology, but I didn’t know much about philosophy. I yearned to learn more.

I think I researched teacher training for about 3 years before I actually signed up. In hindsight, I can see that I was avoiding it because I knew I’d have to confront some things about myself. Holding that mirror up to yourself can be scary. But I am so thankful I did the Yoga Nook teacher training. It taught me so much about Yoga, and yet so much more about myself.

What inspires your teaching? 

I’m constantly inspired by the human body — not only how the human body moves, but also how it moves differently for each of us. My yoga pose is not your yoga pose. We are all different.

How would you describe your teaching style? What makes your classes unique? 

When I first started teaching yoga, I was more focused on the workout; now I also try to make it a work-in. It’s more focused on noticing how and why your body moves in a particular way, and being in the pose and not just in your own head.

Having a background in personal training and group fitness gives me the ability to adapt easily, offer multi-level options of each pose, and to think outside the box. I also like to add some humor into my classes. Yoga can be fun too!

What is your favorite pose, and why? 

Not a particular pose, but a type: twists. They have so many benefits, but being an anatomy nerd, I love that they give us a real opportunity to compare our bodies from one side to the other. How is the right side different to the left? Noticing these differences in my own body is a big part of my own practice, and I incorporate this into all my classes too. The human body is amazing!

If you could choose one quote that best encompasses your approach, what would it be? 

“Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love. It will not lead you astray.” –Rumi

 

RYT 200 training starts next week! We checked in with recent grads…

Can you believe our next RYT 200 teacher training is right around the corner? The deadline to sign up is this coming Wed, Jan. 18, and our first meeting is Fri, Jan. 20. We have a few spots left — call Jeni at 805-390-8175 and check out the syllabus!

As we look forward to this gathering of a new group of kindred spirits, brought together by our love of Yoga, we thought we’d check in with a couple recent grads to see what they’re up to:

“As a graduate of the Yoga Nook RYT 200 training, I am now able to apply all that I’ve learned toward my ‘day job’ working with children with Special Needs — as well as teaching in the community. It was the best decision I ever made to bring my practice to the next level.

Yoga is so much more than poses and breathing. It’s a way to help transform your lifestyle and bring you back to your true self.” — Niki Lewin


“The Yoga Nook teacher training is a life-transforming experience. It taught me so much about myself. I realized that the physical practice of Yoga is just the tip of the iceberg in becoming a teacher.

I’m currently teaching two days a week at a community center in Westlake Village, and at Yoga Nook whenever possible. I highly recommend this program for anyone who is a lover of Yoga. It has deepened my practice in every way.” — Yael McMillan

If you’re feeling a desire within to grow your own practice or teach others, call Jeni at 805-390-8175 and view the syllabus here. Be sure to sign up before Wednesday!

 

Cracking My Own Case

This week we’re featuring a guest post from Kim GalbraithYoga Nook teacher and creator of Little Dog Yogawhich offers yoga classes for athletes in competitive sports. Read on for Kim’s story about a rough trip to the dentist, playing “yoga detective,” and not being afraid to ask for a helping hand.

Having completed 500 hours of yoga teacher training at Yoga Nook, I am well aware that holding tension in my body will create contracted muscles. I am also aware that contracted muscles lead to imbalance and dysfunction in the body, which in turn create pain and discomfort.

So when I had dental work done and woke up with severe pain the next morning — not in my mouth, but in my shoulder! — I set out to solve my own case.

Why the heck does my shoulder hurt? Even just standing was painful. My collarbone (clavicle) felt as if it was being pulled down by a 100-pound weight. No matter how hard I tried to relax my right shoulder, the pain would not subside.

I wondered if this was the result of how I held my right arm during the procedure. So I channeled my favorite Forensic Files character and performed my own reenactment, sitting in the front seat of my car to mimic the reclined position at the dentist’s office.

How was my body positioned during the procedure? My right arm was bent at the elbow, and since the armrest was too low, I was holding the arm up and away from my body slightly by lifting my right shoulder. Since the IV was attached to the inside of my forearm, my knuckles were facing out, adding a degree of external rotation in the shoulder joint.

What muscles were responsible for helping me hold this position? Well, the biceps bend the arm at the elbow, while infraspinatus and teres minor help with external rotation. The trapezius and levator scapulae are the primary movers in elevation of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint, which connects to the clavicle; and pectoralis major and deltoid lift the arm away from the body.

Other factors: Since I’m a yoga teacher and I practice pretty much daily, I do a lot of Adho Mukha Svanasanas (a.k.a. Downward Facing Dog). I also broke my right clavicle and dislocated my right shoulder when I was a teenager, so I have some instability in that arm already. I tend to have tight pectoral muscles that try to do more than they should to keep me stabilized in arm balance poses.

So what did I do? I tried to think like Jeni! I implemented my own plan to release the muscles that I identified as tight and contracted. But after attempting this on my own, I wasn’t getting the results I needed. I wasn’t really able to add the resistance necessary to release the tight areas. I needed help.

Thankfully, after only two sessions with Jeni, my pain was 95% gone. Together, with her guidance and my focused awareness, we got those heavily contracted muscles to soften and relax.

The moral of the story? I realized that even though I’ve learned a ton about the human body through teacher training — knowledge that has empowered me to heal myself and support my students — we all need a little help sometimes from our friends and practitioners to promote the healing process.

Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it. And don’t wait until your pain gets worse — call Jeni!

 

Image credit: University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences via Flickr (CC)

One Path to the Center

This last weekend, I spent a day at the beach with the Yoga Nook advanced teacher training group. The weather was cool and overcast when we arrived with shovels, gloves and tamping tools. Soon all of us were digging in the sand. As we worked, beachgoers walked by and asked what we were building. Some tried to guess, though no one was successful.

We were building a labyrinth, which is frequently confused with a maze, though they are quite different. A maze is a puzzle to be solved — which way will take me to the center? It has blind alleys, twists and turns, and requires one who enters to make choices at intersections. A labyrinth, on the other hand, is unicursal, meaning there is only one way in and one way out.

The labyrinthine pattern has been found on Greek coins dating back to 430 BCE, and the Romans reproduced many one-path patterns in tile and mosaic. By 1000 CE, labyrinths had begun to appear on the walls and floors of churches, providing a tool for private prayer and connection to the divine.

Walking a labyrinth is meditative and profound. The path is deceivingly long and seems to take you right into the center at first, then veers away, spiraling you outwards to explore the periphery.

The changes in direction require steady focus, and the outside world drops away as you concentrate on the task at hand. Just when you think you are furthest from the center, you are really closest to it; so coming into center is a surprise, almost unexpected.

We collected feathers, rocks and driftwood to decorate and define our project, and each person had an opportunity to walk the path several times. Then we left it in the sand for anyone to enjoy, and for the elements to reclaim — a wonderful practice in non-attachment.

 

Chakras on the Brain

I have a confession to make. I love brains! In my work as a somatic educator, I work with brains every day, and I’m always amazed at how they problem-solve, create and strategize.

Frequently clients laugh as I help them first recognize, then reeducate a deeply held pattern of movement. Sometimes the brain is so invested in a pattern, it takes awhile before it will let go of the habit. I have often felt emotional when we finally get a breakthrough and the pattern begins to change to make movement more comfortable and functional.

The chakras, taken together, are a philosophical tool to help us understand how we live in the world and how to balance ourselves. Through my research on brain function, I was inspired to investigate where the qualities of the chakras would be located if they were projected onto the brain.

I wondered if we could access those brain areas through visualization, movement and working with partners. Clearly we would need more time than a regular class would allow, so I created a workshop format for this interesting and informative journey, “Chakras on the Brain.”

This workshop is an experiential journey into your brain, helping you connect with different areas that govern emotion, movement, imagination, compassion and proprioception. A short lecture will give you some background about chakras and a comparison between the traditional view and this new and unique approach.

A large portion of the workshop is movement- and breath-oriented, but the pace is easy and gentle like an AIM class. It’s about your personal experience, so it will be very relaxing as well as informative.

I hope you can join me.

Chakras on the Brain Workshop
Saturday, July 23
11am – 4:30pm (30 min. break for lunch)
Yoga Nook @ Fifth
690 D Los Angeles Ave.
Simi Valley, CA 93065
$69

 

Beyond the Poses: A Day-Long Retreat in Ojai

What comes to mind when you think of a retreat? Most likely you imagine some sort of getaway, perhaps on a pristine beach far from home or in a cozy cabin tucked away in the mountains. Indeed, one definition of retreat is “an act of moving back or withdrawing” — stepping away from your regular routine and withdrawing to a quiet place.

On the other hand, a retreat can also be a catalyst that helps us move forward and step into the qualities or ways of being we want to cultivate, but that we sometimes lose touch with in the midst of our habitual cycles. In doing something different and learning something new, we’re able to see things with a fresh perspective. A seed of growth is planted.

In the words of the philosopher, speaker and writer Jiddu Krishnamurti (1895-1986):

It is essential sometimes to go into retreat, to stop everything that you have been doing, to stop your experiences completely and look at them anew, not keep on repeating them like machines. You would then let fresh air into your mind. Wouldn’t you? This place must be of great beauty with trees, birds, and quietness, for beauty is truth and truth is goodness and love.

In every sense of the word, the Krishnamurti Center in Ojai is an ideal place to retreat. Every year the emerging teachers in the Yoga Nook 200-hour teacher training visit the Krishnamurti Center to explore the library, gardens and educational center — which features talks and interviews with J. Krishnamurti on universal themes like conflict, fear, education, truth and meditation.

Krishnamurti Library
Krishnamurti Library

On Saturday, June 4, Yoga Nook will host Beyond the Poses, a day-long retreat in the Krishnamurti Center’s Pepper Tree Pavilion, overlooking the Ojai Valley and on-site gardens. The teachers in Yoga Nook’s current 300-hour teacher training (Jo, Kim G., Annika, Kim S., Tami and Pati) will lead fun and relaxing workshops with themes surrounding the 8 Limbs of Yoga, or the eight-fold path.

pepper tree pavilion
Pepper Tree Pavilion at the Krishnamurti Center

Net proceeds from the event will benefit The Gentle Barn, a Santa Clarita nonprofit that rescues and rehabilitates severely abused animals, and facilitates interaction with the animals to teach kids about kindness and compassion.

Beyond the Poses: An Exploration of the 8 Limbs of Yoga
Cost: $95*
Saturday, June 4, 2016
10 a.m. – 4 p.m. (registration at 9:30 a.m.)
Krishnamurti Center
1098 McAndrew Rd.
Ojai, CA 93023

*Includes lunch, snacks, beverages and gift bags

Space is limited. Register today in-person at Yoga Nook, email yoganookcalling@gmail.com or call (805) 390-8175 to reserve your spot. You can also RSVP on our Facebook page.

 

Becoming a Yoga Teacher

It’s the weekend of Yoga Nook Teacher Training practicums, and I’m sitting in a corner of the studio with a clipboard in my lap, pen poised. I’m attempting to be as inconspicuous as possible as I critique the teachers, but stress levels are high.

Their personal yoga journey has brought them to this point. Standing in front of a group of students, they are about to teach their first yoga class. From this moment on, they are true yoga teachers.

They’re nervous – no escaping that – yet on some level, they know that the last 10 months of practice and study are about to pay off. From philosophy to technique, and a large helping of looking inside to find their essential selves, they’ve discovered new strengths, learned new skill sets and developed the teacher within.

They have all changed from the students that began this program in January. Each transformation has been unique and stunning in its evolution. Their perspective has shifted – indeed, it will never really be the same again, as the wealth of knowledge they have accumulated will make each yoga class richer and more meaningful.

Their experience of their personal yoga practice has deepened because they can identify class progression, escalation and resolution. The thousands of years that Yoga has been used as a foundation for meditation, focus and self-control now becomes the pool from which they draw inspiration for teaching their own classes.

For us, the faculty, we are honored to be part of this remarkable process. We teach them how to hold a class in their hands and in their hearts. We guide them to discover their true Self so that through this discovery, they can be a creative leader. We offer support when they are frustrated or confused, and through being human and living our own Yoga, we are their touchstone.

Congratulations to the 2015 graduates. You are all exceptional students, and the faculty wish you the very best of luck as you continue to share your Yoga with the classes you teach and the people in your lives.

If you are interested in becoming a Registered Yoga Teacher and joining the group now forming for January 2016, take a look at the syllabus on our website or contact us via email. Proficiency in asana is preferred but not required; the only prerequisites are an open mind and heart.

 

Image credit: Steve Prakope via Flickr (CC)