One Path to the Center

This last weekend, I spent a day at the beach with the Yoga Nook advanced teacher training group. The weather was cool and overcast when we arrived with shovels, gloves and tamping tools. Soon all of us were digging in the sand. As we worked, beachgoers walked by and asked what we were building. Some tried to guess, though no one was successful.

We were building a labyrinth, which is frequently confused with a maze, though they are quite different. A maze is a puzzle to be solved — which way will take me to the center? It has blind alleys, twists and turns, and requires one who enters to make choices at intersections. A labyrinth, on the other hand, is unicursal, meaning there is only one way in and one way out.

The labyrinthine pattern has been found on Greek coins dating back to 430 BCE, and the Romans reproduced many one-path patterns in tile and mosaic. By 1000 CE, labyrinths had begun to appear on the walls and floors of churches, providing a tool for private prayer and connection to the divine.

Walking a labyrinth is meditative and profound. The path is deceivingly long and seems to take you right into the center at first, then veers away, spiraling you outwards to explore the periphery.

The changes in direction require steady focus, and the outside world drops away as you concentrate on the task at hand. Just when you think you are furthest from the center, you are really closest to it; so coming into center is a surprise, almost unexpected.

We collected feathers, rocks and driftwood to decorate and define our project, and each person had an opportunity to walk the path several times. Then we left it in the sand for anyone to enjoy, and for the elements to reclaim — a wonderful practice in non-attachment.

 

Chakras on the Brain

I have a confession to make. I love brains! In my work as a somatic educator, I work with brains every day, and I’m always amazed at how they problem-solve, create and strategize.

Frequently clients laugh as I help them first recognize, then reeducate a deeply held pattern of movement. Sometimes the brain is so invested in a pattern, it takes awhile before it will let go of the habit. I have often felt emotional when we finally get a breakthrough and the pattern begins to change to make movement more comfortable and functional.

The chakras, taken together, are a philosophical tool to help us understand how we live in the world and how to balance ourselves. Through my research on brain function, I was inspired to investigate where the qualities of the chakras would be located if they were projected onto the brain.

I wondered if we could access those brain areas through visualization, movement and working with partners. Clearly we would need more time than a regular class would allow, so I created a workshop format for this interesting and informative journey, “Chakras on the Brain.”

This workshop is an experiential journey into your brain, helping you connect with different areas that govern emotion, movement, imagination, compassion and proprioception. A short lecture will give you some background about chakras and a comparison between the traditional view and this new and unique approach.

A large portion of the workshop is movement- and breath-oriented, but the pace is easy and gentle like an AIM class. It’s about your personal experience, so it will be very relaxing as well as informative.

I hope you can join me.

Chakras on the Brain Workshop
Saturday, July 23
11am – 4:30pm (30 min. break for lunch)
Yoga Nook @ Fifth
690 D Los Angeles Ave.
Simi Valley, CA 93065
$69